Search Results for: sewing room organization challenge

SEWING ROOM ORGANIZATION CHALLENGE – PART VII – SEWING ROOM DESIGN

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A PLACE TO CREATE

Whether you have an entire room dedicated to your creative space, closet, guest room, under a staircase, hallway, garage, basement, attic or corner of the kids’ playroom–claim your space!

Nothing is more frustrating than having to drag out your sewing machine and supplies every time the creative bug strikes.

ROOM PLANNING SOFTWARE

Start with a plan by first accessing your needs.  Sewing rooms are as individual as the sewers who use them.  One who sews ladies’ garments will have different sewing needs than one who quilts or sews home decor.

Smart Draw Free Trial

Better Homes and Gardens’ Arrange-A-Room

Jordan’s Room Planner

MyFloorPlanner.com

Room Planner

Icovia Space Planner – Design Edition

Free Furniture Templates

Raymour & Flanigan Room Planner

COLOR

colorwheel

Choosing Color

Selecting the perfect color for your sewing room is a personal choice.  I chose Pink accented with Black and White.  I had originally planned on using Brown to accent the Pink, but decided against it as it is much easier to find Black and White items to coordinate. 

Sherwin Williams’ Color Visualizer

Benjamin Moore’s Personal Color Viewer

Pantone’s Paint Selector

Sewing Room Color Ideas

Bella Dia’s Sewing Room and Alicia Paulson’s Romantic Portland Sewing Studio

Magda’s Black and White Sewing Room

House on the Hill’s Little Sewing Space

I Mess Around’s Bright Blue Studio

Happy Zombie’s Inspiring Sewing Room

Melissss’ Craft Room

Jessica Griffin’s Pink Sewing Room

Creative Little Daisy’s Pretty Studio

Elneenya’s Terra Cotta Red Sewing Room

Jenni Apple’s Deep Red Sewing Studio

Syrommet Mitt’s Yellow and Green Sewing Studio

Dog Child’s Pink Studio\Sew Pixie’s Sewing Room

Pink Present’s Sage Green Workroom

Squeaky Monkey’s Orange Miniature Sewing Room

Chalet Girl’s Bright Pink Sewing Room

Amber’s Aqua Craft Room

Quaint Handmade’s Soft Pink Sewing Room

Dharma Lemon’s Retro Green Sewing Nook

Jigabug Baby’s Butter Cream Sewing Room

Liquid Paper’s Dark Gray Studio

Crafty Intention’s Aqua and Red Studio

Lucky Lola’s Bright Pink Sewing Room

FLOORING

Whatever you do, don’t install carpeting if you can help it.  Carpets hide pins, needles and other little sewing notions.  Use flooring that is easy to care for such as concrete, hardwood, vinyl or tile.

Consider an anti-fatigue mat next to your cutting table:

antifatique

Wearwell’s Anti-Fatigue Mats

KEY INGREDIENTS

SEWING WORKSTATION

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There are dozens of ways to set up your sewing machines.  I use an L-shaped desk and a sturdy folding table for sewing machines and sergers.  Figure out what fits your budget and go from there.

Depending if you have one sewing machine or several, you could set your workstation up against one wall, in a U-shaped or L-shaped configuration.  Here’s some sewing workstation ideas:

koala

Koala Cabinets

magicboxstudycraft

  Horn Sewing Cabinets

hornregal

Horn’s Regal Multi-Height Electric Lift Table

 arrowcabinet

Arrow Cabinets

perfexion

Perfexion Tables

slyvia

Sylvia Designs

roberts

Robert’s Fine Sewing Furniture

sullivan

Sullivan Furniture

delta

Delta Cabinets

deluxe

Deluxe Tables

cuttingtablesouthern

Totally Furniture’s $99 Southern Enterprises Sewing Table

southern

Southern Enterprises’ Sewing Cabinet

joanntable

Joann’s $139 Sewing Table

Other Joann’s Homespun Sewing Tables

sauder

Sauder’s Craft Armoire

OMG…is this the ULTIMATE Craft Armoire:

workbox

The Work Box™

hirshdeskwdrawers

Hirsh Craft Storage Stand with Drawers

pneumatictable

BALT Pneumatic (Adjustable) Workstation

adjustablefoldingtable

Adjustable Height Folding Table adjusts from 22″ to 32″

foldtable

Folding Table

CUTTING TABLE

clean

My current cutting table is an old conference room table I acquired from my husband’s old office.  It was a little too low, so I raised the table legs using adjustable bed risers (see below).

Minimum Width – 23 inches.  Ideally, 36 inches would be sufficient as it equals the length of folded decorator fabric.  However, 60 inches would be even better as you could spread most fabrics open.

cuttingtablenew 

Minimum Length – 36 inches (1 yard).  72 inches would be ideal for most.  However, if you work with larger lengths of fabric, purchase the longest cutting table you can fit in your space.  My new cutting table (pictured above) is 4 feet wide by 16 feet long–the big industrial type  table I need to transition from home sewing into apparel manufacturing.

Minimum Height – 34 to 36 inches.  Ideal height would be the at 2 to 4 inches below your waist.  If you’re under 5′ 3″, you might be comfortable with a table height of 32 inches while if you’re closer to 6′ tall, a 38 inch height would be great.  If you need to raise your cutting surface, use:

bedrisers

Adjustable bed risers which raise the cutting table 3.2 to 5.2 inches more or

bedrisersxtall

Extra Tall Adjustable Bed Risers which raise the table up to 8 inches higher

Kathy of Pink Chalk Studio used PVC pipes to raise her folding table from 28 inches to 36 inches…how clever!

cuttingtableorg 

Cutting Tables

regalcutting

Sullivan’s $99 Cutting Table

arrowcutting

Arrow Cutting Table

robertscutting

Robert’s Cutting Table with Storage Drawers

saberpowrpax

Saber’s Pow-R-Pax Industrial Cutting Tables

alvincraftmaster

Alvin Craftmaster Hobby Station adjusts from 0 – 30 degrees

What about that big freezer chest?   Surely it would make a great cutting table. You could add a sheet of plywood to the wall mounted with piano hinges…and add a latch hook to keep it from knocking you in the head when digging in the freezer.  Or if you’re not that handy, you could just put a large cutting mat on top of it.  LOL!

If you have a handyman around the house, enlist them to build a custom cutting table for you:

diybuildtable

DIY.net’s Build Your Own

PRESSING STATION

 

tablecover

Sullivan Ironing Cover for Cutting Tables

bigboard

Nancy’s Notions’ Big Board

Here’s a bunch of iron board cover tutorials:

Vain and Vapid’s Design Studio Details – Ironing Board Makeover

U-Hangblog’s Super Easy Iron Board Cover

Feed Dog’s Cover for IKEA Ironing Board Tutorial

Innovative Sewing’s Ironing Board Cover Tutorial

Instructables’ Fabulous Ironing Board Cover

Marma Daisy’s New Ironing Board Cover

Purl Bee’s Ironing Board Recovery Project

STORAGE

jumboorganizer

Jumbo Organizer

moragadrawercaddy

Moraga Drawer Caddy

miniworkbox

Mini Workbox™

ScrapbookCart

Container Store’s Scrapbook Cart

pinkjuxta

Container Store’s UMBRA Pink Juxta Drawers

robertsstorage

Robert’s Storage Caddy

fabriccollection5

Metal Storage Cabinets from Staples

ssarmoire

South Shore Armoire at Staples

whitebookcase

Simple White Bookcase under $50

For lots of ideas on how to organize and store your supplies, check out:

Custom Cabinetry

Wall cabinets are available in several heights and widths. The height(s) you choose depends on your ceiling and whether your design includes a soffit. Wall cabinet widths range from 9″ to 48″ with adjustable shelving.

Standard base cabinets are 34-1/2″ high and 24″ deep, and range in width from 9″ to 48″, increasing in 3″ increments. Base cabinets are available with full-height drawers, door and drawer combinations or full stacks of drawers.

Tall cabinets are 84″, 90″ or 96″ high, range from 9″ to 36″ wide, are 12″ to 24″ deep and include a toe kick area. They’re available with doors or a door and drawer combination.

Prices vary greatly depending on the manufacturer, type, hardware and installation.  Consider shopping home improvement stores for the best prices on cabinets and countertops.

CHAIRS

Don’t skimp when it comes to your sewing room chair.  Your back will thank you!

taskchairblack

Black Leather Task Chair under $50

potterybarnchair

Pottery Barn Swivel Chair

checkerboardchair

Checkerboard Chair

globaltaskchair

Global Task Chair

Design*Sponge’s Office Chair Upgrade Tutorial

Turkey Feather’s Desk Chair Cover Tutorial

LIGHTING

Lighting in a sewing room is one of those things which is constantly overlooked.  Yet, it is one of the most important elements in designing a sewing room.  Although there are several different types of lighting, the two most important types in a sewing room are:

Ambient Lighting, also known as General Lighting, provides overall illumination.  This type of lighting is created by using recessed lighting in the ceiling, table lamps, chandeliers, track lights, and other ceiling fixtures.  Ambient lighting radiates an even amount of light in the room.  If you are using fluorescent bulbs in your overhead lighting, check out the “sunlight” replacement bulbs to give a more natural light.

Task Lighting directs light just where you need it.  Desk lamps, ceiling pendant fixtures and track lighting are considered task lighting fixtures.  Task lighting performs a specific activity.  Consider an Ott Light in your sewing room for true color.

BONUS INGREDIENTS

DESIGN WALLS AND INSPIRATION BOARDS

anthropologie

Design Wall

A Design Wall is a wall in your sewing room or work area with a felt, flannel, or similar fabric to which your quilt pieces will stick.  Sometimes this will be permanent; other times it consists of this fabric tacked to the wall.

You can easily make a wall to plan your next quilt or garment.  Here’s some great ideas:

The World Wide Quilting

Quiltmaker’s Building a Design Wall

Get Creative’s Make Your Own Design Wall

Jan Myer’s How to Create a Quilting Design Wall

Linda P. of Moonlight Quilters’ Portable Design Wall Instructions

If you don’t want to make your own, you could just buy one:

Block Butler

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Cheryl Ann’s Portable Design Wall

Inspiration Boards

ideaboard1

You can also make an Inspiration Board (aka Idea Board) like mine above.  Simple use some spray adhesive to attach fabric to a cord board and use some decorative trim to cover the fabric’s raw edges.  Here’s some other tutorials:

Not Nigella

iHanna

Charity Grace

Fresh and Vintage

Martha Stewart’s Framed Bulletin Board

Martha Stewart’s Homasote Bulletin Board

Make an Inspiration Board from Associated Content

Inspiration Boards on Flickr

DRESSFORMS AND MANNEQUINS

divaisin

Consider adding a dressform or mannequin to your sewing room.  Not only can you use it to size garments, but it can be a decorative element for you to display your unique trims and lace.

Dressforms are available in canvas, wire, wicker and even paper mache.

victorianmannequin

Wicker Dressform

wiremannequin

Wire Mannequin

Make Your Own Dressform

THE LITTLE THINGS

aprilpin

It’s the little things that make your sewing space your own.  Don’t be afraid to re-purpose household items and antiques to decorate your sewing room.

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Bowls, baskets and other containers make great organizers and add your personal touch to your room.

sewingroomsigns

Have fun with wall art, paintings and other items to hang on your walls.  You could even use decoupage letters to spell SEW or CREATE.  What about a huge pair of scissors?  Check out these neat sewing room silhouettes.  Or what about a vinyl zipper, a humorous saying, or some vinyl dressforms?

vintagesewingbox

Be sure to shop flea markets for vintage items to complete your sewing room.  The possibilities are ENDLESS!

BOOKS

quiltingspace

Creating Your Perfect Quilting Space

quiltspaceplanner

Perfect Quilting Space Planner

dreamsewingspaces

Dream Sewing Spaces

yourcraftspace

Organizing Your Craft Space

wherewomencreate

Where Women Create

creativeperson

Organizing for the Creative Person

scrapbookspace

Organize Your Scrapbook Workspace

organizedinspiredscrapbooker

The Organized & Inspired Scrapbooker

organizationtipsforscrapbookers

Organization Tips for Scrapbookers

homeworkspaceideabook

Home Workspace Idea Book

Homestorageideabook

Home Storage Idea Book

cabinetshelves

Cabinets, Shelves and Home Storage Solutions

REAL SEWING ROOMS

A List of Over 100 Links of Sewing Rooms

Sewing.org’s Behind the Seams Sewing Rooms

Pictures of Sewing and Quilting Rooms

Now get moving!  Although it’s a work in progress, you can create the sewing room of your dreams!

lisasiggie2 

SEWING ROOM ORGANIZATION CHALLENGE – PART VI – NOTION COMMOTION©

NOTION COMMOTION

dummies

In addition to your Sewing Room, any of these organization ideas can be used in your Craft Room, Scrapbooking Corner and/or Jewelry Making Studio.  Get creative!

Ok…it’s time to get back to work! We have a few little things we need to still need to organize, so let’s get started.

CLOSURES

There are literally dozens of ways to fasten a garment or home décor item. Get yourself some clear containers or cheap photo boxes and start sorting your closures. Make sure you label each container and stack it on your shelves. Here’s how I divide them:

Zippers

Buttons, Snaps, Eyelets, Grommets, Hooks and Eyes

Elastic, Velcro and Snap Tape

ZIPPERS

zippersteresa

Teresa Franco’s awesome zipper storage idea

You could also organize your zippers with safety pins, but instead put them on a tie rack:

tierack4zippers

Revolving Tie Rack from Harriet Carter

tierack

Wall Mounted Tie Rack

Just bought my husband this motorized revolving tie rack.  Think he’d mind if I borrowed it for my ribbon?  LOL

tierackbrookstone

Brookstone Motorized Revolving Tie Rack

BUTTONS, SNAPS, EYELETS, GROMMETS, HOOKS AND EYES

There are literally hundreds of ways you can organize these small objects.  I store my snaps and buttons in these See n Store magnetic containers:

snapsw

I currently have 36 of these nifty containers and plan to add more as needed.  They can be mounted on the wall or free-standing and in a variety of combinations:

lipper8standing

5 Tin Magnetic Standing Storage at Organize.com

5 Tin Magnetic Hanging Storage at Organize.com

8 Tin Magnetic Standing Storage at Oriental Trading

customspice

Custom Magnetic Spice Racks

kamensteinspice

Kamenstein Magnetic Spice Rack

modular

Making Memories Modular Storage System

If you’re trying to keep costs down, Make Your Own Magnetic Storage Board.  You only need FOUR things to make this quick and easy board to hold your sewing and craft notions:

1 -STEEL SHEET

2 – SMALL METAL CONTAINERS

3 – MAGNETS

4 – GLUE

  • Crazy Glue™
  • Hot Glue

Have your husband or dad drill four holes in the corner of the steel sheet/board for mounting, if desired.

Hang sheet/board on wall or store in drawer.

Glue a magnet to the back of each container.  Let dry.

Stick magnetic containers to sheet/board.  Done!

buttoncontainer

Martha Stewart adds Buttons to her Magnetic Containers

photocontainer

Add a photo to your containers if you’d like.

Additional magnetic board tutorials:

aimistruespice

Amber’s DIY Spice Rack

lowesmagneticboard

Lowe’s Magnetic Board Tutorial

Other clever storage ideas:

solution

Solutions Station Set

deflectocarosel

Deflecto Revolving Clear Storage at Shoplet.com

DrawerCabinet

Drawer Cabinet at Shoplet.com

bank

Button Bank

jarsmm

Making Memories’ Jars

glassjars

Economical Glass Jars by the Case

ikeajar

Fancy Jars

storagetins

Storage Tins

artbincompartment

ArtBin 24 Compartment Slide ‘n Store

sortables

Making Memories’ Sortables

carouselorganizer 

Carousel Organizer

snaporganizer

Snap or Button Organizer from Stacks n Stacks

60drawer

60 Translucent Drawer Unit

beadtower

Bead and Embellishment Tower

Bubblebox Organizer w/36 Compartments

36 Compartment Bubble Box

You could also use a rail system installed on your wall:

railsystem

Rail System

and add the coordinating wire basket and/or containers:

wirebasket

Wire Basket

I absolutely love my Deflect-o Tilt Out Storage Bins.  They are my favorite storage system in my sewing room:

KEYCHAINS2

These bins come in all different sizes to suit your needs and lock together.  They can be mounted on the wall or placed on a shelf:

deflectobins

Deflect-o Tilt-Out Clear Storage Bins at TheNerds.com

Deflect-o Tilt-Out Clear Storage Bins from Staples.com

provodrawerz

Provo Clear Mini Drawers

ELASTIC, VELCRO AND SNAP-TAPE
With all the different sizes and applications, it is easy to accumulate a large “stash” of elastic. I sort my elastic into three stacked storage boxes:

Thin Elastic (includes elastic thread)

Foldover Elastic and Decorative Elastic

Waistband Elastic

Here’s my pink leather boxes (once again from Home Goods):

elasticboxes

My Velcro and Snap-Tape are stored in similar leather boxes.  Any type of storage container, box or drawer will work:

cdbox 

IKEA CD Boxes

glisplasticboxes

GLIS Plastic Boxes

ikeaphotobox

IKEA Decorative Boxes

interlockingboxes

Interlocking Clear Containers

clearshoe

Clear Acrylic Stackable Storage Drawers

smallorganizerdrawer

Small Organizer Drawers

towerorganizer

10 Drawer Tower Organizer

storagecube

Foremost Modular Storage Drawer Cubes

You can cover these drawers with either fabric or paper and then use decoupage to seal them:

woodendrawers

IKEA Wooden Drawers

You can even make erasable labels on each drawer:

eraseablelabels

Erasable Label Tutorial

MARKING AND CUTTING IMPLEMENTS


spinner

Are you constantly trying to find your favorite scissor or disappearing (literally) marking pen? A great solution is to find some type of utensil caddy which can be placed on your cutting table and then moved next to your sewing machine when needed.  I found this great revolving caddy (pictured above) at my local Home Goods store.

Check out your local office supplies store in their desk accessories aisle for lots of good ideas.
In this type of caddy, you can store:

clip_image004
Prior to getting my neat revolving caddy, I used to store all my extra marking pens, scissors, tube turners, etc. in leather containers (also found as Home Goods).  For the items I don’t want to keep on my cutting table, I use one of these nifty Tupperware Utensil Caddies:

tupperwareutensil

Here’s a few more organizers to consider:

HSNCaddy

The Caddy at HSN 

deskrubbermaid

Rubbermaid Rotating Desk Organizer

storagespinner

Donna Dewberry Storage Spinner

ToolCaddyGrabbit

Grabbit Tool Caddy

cabelarotatingtool

Cabela’s Revolving Tool Caddy

cuttercubby

Cutter Cubby

supplycaddy

Portable Supply Caddy

caddy

Table Top Caddy

caddy

Economical Caddy

brushcaddy

Tool Holder

pinkutensil2

Utensil Holder with Adjustable Dividers

shabbyholder

Shabby Chic Utensil Holder

If you don’t have the space on your cutting surface or it’s portable, consider hanging your cutting implements on the wall:

perfboard-improvements

Plastic Perf Board

EZ Wall Organizer

metalrailsystem

Metal Rail System at HSN

pegboard

Clotidle’s Peg Board

wallhutch

Wall Hutch

wallpocket

Wall Pocket

Tip:  The height of your cutting surface is so important as to avoid an aching back.  I use these under the legs of my table:

bed-lifters-320717zz

Adjustable Bed Risers

 RULERS

rulerholder

I use a wire mesh letter holder from my local office supplies store to hold my rulers at the end of my cutting table.  You can easily organize your rulers by either hanging them or standing them up like I do.  Here are some ways to do it:

JuneTailerRuleYourRulers

June Tailor Rule Your Rulers

QuiltRulerOrganzier

Quilting Ruler Organizer Shelf on Ebay

RulerHolderRack

Ruler Holder Rack on Ebay

rulerholderebay

Ruler Holder Shelf on Ebay

rulerorganizer

Ruler and Mat Organizer

rulerrackcombo

Rulers & Ruler Rack Combo Set

rulerrackclotilde

Clotilde Ruler Rack

rulerkorral

Ruler Korral

Stop your Ruler from sliding on fabric.  I really works:

invisigrip

Quilter’s Review

If you need a paper ruler to attach to the end of your table, here’s a free printable one.  Consider sending this ruler link to those you sew for (family, friends, customers, etc.) to get easy measurements:

Free Printable Rulers

SEWING STATION

There are a few things I like to keep next to my sewing machines:

divabowl

Get yourself a small bowl, container or divided tray (I use a dog dish…LOL) to keep all your necessary sewing supplies next to your sewing machine.  You’ll be able to easily find what you need without going through drawers and cabinets.

Here’s some other ideas:

sewingstation

Sewing Station

junestation 

June Tailor Sewing Station

Make your own Sewing Station:

sewroom

Sewing.org’s Sewing Station Tutorial

Consider purchasing sewing machine and serger cushioned pads (helps with machine vibration) and thread/scrap catchers:

sewmachpad

Pedal-Sta’s Sewing Machine Pad w/ Thread Catcher

clotildethreadcatcher

Clotilde’s Serger Pad and Thread Catcher

sergerpad-lg

Pedal-Sta’s Serger Pad w/ Scrap Catcher

pioneerthreadcatcher

Pioneer’s Serger Pad Thread Catcher at Joann’s

Sew Essentials Scrap Caddy

Joann’s Sew Essential Scrap Caddy

You can also make your own:

kquiltsthreadcatcher

K Quilts’ Pincushion and Thread Catcher Tutorial

image

Kezza’s Pincushion and Thread Catcher Tutorial

SEWING MACHINE / SERGER PRESSER FEET

Do you always find yourself looking blanking at a strange sewing machine foot and wondering what on earth is its purpose? Well, then it’s time to sort through them. I have dozens of sewing machine and serger feet. I use a divided pink leather case to easily store my sewing machine feet. If you label each section, it will be easy to locate the one needed.

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I keep my serger feet in a divided leather tray:
clip_image003

You can use a cigar box (decoupage it with fabric):

cigarbox

Cigar Boxes on Ebay Express
or any divided box:

boxmoveabledividers 
Clear Box with Moveable Dividers

blackbox

Small Parts Storage Case

12compartmentbox

Budget 12 Compartment Storage Case

and label it like Mean Jean did:

meanjeanpresserfeet

Mean Jean’s Presser Foot Organizer

You can even use a cutlery tray!
flatwaretray 

Expandable Bamboo Flatware Tray

A jewelry organizer will also work!jewelryorganizer

Jewelry Organizer at Stacks n Stacks

or Jewelry Case

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PINK Jewelry Case

You can also purchase a great “foot organizer” from your local sewing dealer or use clear baseball card plastic sleeve protectors in a regular binder:

 

sewingnotionscaddy

Home Depot’s Sewing Notions Organizer

pfc3

Nancy’s Notions’ Presser Foot Storage Cases

Or make your own:

presserfootorganizer

Husqvarna Viking’s Presser Foot Organizer Tutorial

presserfeetorganizer

Petit Debutante’s Presser Foot Organizer Tutorial

PRESSING SUPPLIES

Keep a small shelf over your ironing board for your pressing supplies. This would include:

pressbox

I keep two boxes next to my pressing station.  One contains all kinds of fusible tape which I use when I’m taking sewing shortcuts…LOL.  In the second box, I store my small pressing aids such as my Ezy Hem Guide, Iron Cleaner and Point Turner.

tailorboardstation

I hang both my Tailor’s Board and Sleeve Board on the wall next to my ironing board.

drinkdispenser

I purchased one of these Slim Drink Dispensers to keep water (holds a gallon!) next to my ironing board. It saves me dozens of trips back and forth to the sink to refill my iron!

You could also use a mounted peg board with hooks to hang all your pressing essentials.

MISCELLANEOUS SUPPLIES

I’m sure you have lots of other supplies which need to be organized and stored.  The list seems endless…LOL!  Here’s two more great storage ideas I came up with:

First, I re-purposed some doll accessory drawers.  These drawers store my size labels, garment labels, bow-making clips, etc.

pinkdrawers

Next, I came across this neat piano-hinged box at TJ Maxx.

accordianbox

The front cover folds down to reveal my hot fix tool and glues.  I glued a piece of cork board sheeting to the inside of the cover to make a nifty little bulletin board:

insidebox

Since you’re nosey, here’s a close-up of my stickers:

sewingstickers

You can get your own stickers here:

Opinions R Us

Cafe Press

Hope your creative space is finally becoming a place to love to be in–not a dreaded space.  If you have any ideas for additional sewing room organization topics, just email me!

Happy Sewing!

lisasiggie

SEWING ROOM ORGANIZATION CHALLENGE – PART V – SEWING LIBRARY: PATTERNS, EMBROIDERY DESIGNS, MAGAZINES & BOOKS©

divalibarybook

Oh my…what is the Diva talking about? I would bet you thought I ran out of sewing room organizational tasks. Not so!

Since I started sewing a few years ago, I’ve managed to amass a large collection of literature related to sewing. In my library are design inspirations, reference books and a host of other printed goodies such as project instructions and embroidery designs. And unless you get your sewing literature organized, it becomes just a pile of papers. So let’s get started…

SEWINGPATTERNSLABEL

blankpattern

Let’s tackle your sewing patterns first.

SORT

Start by going through ALL of your patterns.  Get some empty cardboard or plastic boxes and attach a label to each indicating the different categories of patterns you have.  There are several ways to categorize your patterns such as:

  • Size – infants, toddlers, children, teens, adults
  • Pattern Company – Simplicity, Vogue, etc.
  • Style: dresses, pants, shirts, loungewear
  • Type: crafts, home decor, garments

Some may find a combination of the above categories works best.  Do what works so you can easily find your patterns in the future.  I sew mostly children’s garments and have my patterns categorized as such:

  • Infants Layette (onesies, bibs, buntings, etc.)
  • Toddler Girls Casual (shirts, pants, skirts, loungewear)
  • Toddler Girls Formal (special occasion dresses and gowns)
  • Girls Casual (shirts, pants, skirts, loungewear)
  • Girls Formal (special occasion dresses and gowns)
  • Toddler Boys Casual (shirts, pants, loungewear)
  • Boys Casual (shirts, pants, loungewear)
  • Hats (all sizes)
  • Home Decor (chair covers, placemats, table runners, bedding, curtains)
  • Crafts (bulletin boards, decorative boxes, sachets, Christmas stockings)
  • Dolls (Barbie and American Girl)

PURGE

Now take one box at a time and go through the sorted patterns.  Discard those patterns which are missing pieces, beyond salvaging and/or no longer of interest (no, you are never going to make that toaster cover–get rid of it).

If you aren’t able to part with your patterns just yet, put them in a box (stored outside your sewing room) and write the date on the box.  If you don’t touch the box within a reasonable amount of time (6 months or a year), then it’s time to get rid of them–no excuses.

Sell (eBay, Etsy, or Craigslist) or donate the patterns you no longer need (community centers, schools, other sewing enthusiasts).

PRESERVE

tracingpaper

Many sewers use the same patterns over and over again.  For these patterns, you might want to:

  • iron fusible stabilizer directly onto the pattern
  • trace the pattern onto manila paper, Swedish tracing paper, grid paper or clear mylar sheeting
  • stick the pattern to contact paper before cutting
  • Glue the pattern to brown craft paper

patternrescue

Need to replace a vintage pattern piece or envelope?  Visit Pattern Rescue.

STORE

There are those who are able to fit the pattern back in its original pattern envelope–good for you.  Once again, I’m not in your club…LOL!  Thankfully there are alternatives.

Ways to store:

Plastic Ziploc Bags

Clear Plastic Sleeves

I purchased two boxes of the 3 hole TOP LOADING (this is important–side loading protectors will be useless sheet protectors.

sheetprotectors

Staples Medium-Weight Clear Sheet Protectors are sold in boxes of 100 or 200.  Don’t buy the Staples Economy Sheet Protectors–they are semi-clear and flimsy.

sheetprotector

1,000 Sheet Protectors on Ebay

patternsaver

Pattern Saver with Extra Pocket

Pattern Saver at Nancy’s Notions

Binders

I put my patterns in clear plastic top-load sleeves, by category (infants, toddler girls, home décor, etc.) and store them inside big wide binders.  I then store the binders on a bookshelf in my sewing studio.

patternbook1

patternbook2

Lots of sewers keep just their pattern envelopes in binders and then store the actual pattern and instruction sheets in boxes or filing cabinets.  I prefer to keep the pattern envelopes and its contents all together.

Pattern Boxes

Use pattern boxes available at your local craft stores.  Depending on the size of the box, they hold between 30 to 40 sewing patterns.

patternfinder

Pattern Finder™ System at Clotilde

patternorganizer

Pattern Boxes at Nancy’s Notions

You can also buy a combo set

patternboxcombo

Combo Set for 90 Patterns at Nancy’s Notions

Filing Cabinets

filing cabinet

Filing Cabinets are a great for holding your pattern stash.  You can easily fit 100 patterns per drawer.

Check out this nifty Pattern Organizer with plastic category tabs:

patternorganizer22

Pattern Organizer for Filing Cabinet

Pattern Organizer at Clotilde

Dressers

What about a beautiful shabby chic dresser?  You could store patterns on their sides.

dresser

Wooden Crates

patterncrate1

Wooden Crate Instructions for your Handy Husband

Clear Boxes

Rubbermaid™ makes clear boxes with high tops.  You could store 3 rows of patterns in one box.  If you want to save money, visit your local dollar store for a great selection.

clearbox

Pattern Hooks

I store my most utilized patterns on professional pattern hooks which all hang on a garment rack in my sewing studio.

patternhooksinshop

Over the Door Storage

pattern_organizer_patterns

If you have a small pattern collection or want to display your treasured vintage patterns, get the pattern to make these Over the Door Pattern Organizers from By Annie’s.   Don’t forget to use a Teflon Foot on your sewing machine when sewing with vinyl.

Pattern Inventory

So, now you that you have all your patterns under control, it’s time to put together a PATTERN INVENTORY list to keep track of those patterns you already own

Create a document in your word processing or database software entitled PATTERN INVENTORY.  Make the following columns:

Manufacturer Pattern # Description Sizes Binder #
McCalls 9876 Girls Skirt 2T-4T 6
McCalls 9688 Boys Shirt 4-7 8

 

Use the SORT feature to organize your pattern information by DESCRIPTION, SIZES or PATTERN NUMBER. With this method, you can easily find the patterns you have using the criteria which best suits your needs.

Other ideas to organize your sewing patterns:

Organized Expressions™ for Sewing

http://www.lns-software.com/sewing/cataloging.html

Wild Ginger software

clip_image003

http://www.wildginger.com/products/stitchnstash.htm

Soul Sista’s Access Database Method for Pattern Storage

http://narcissaqtpie.blogspot.com/2007/05/lets-organize.html

Patterns Wanted

I keep a list of the patterns I want to acquire using Microsoft Word (any word processing or database software will work).  Visit some of the sewing patterns sites for the latest selection. My favorite web sites are:

http://www.sewingpatterns.com/

http://www.patternreview.com

Create a document entitled, “PATTERNS WANTED” with the following columns:

Manufacturer

Pattern #

Description

Sizes

Burda

9799

Boys Pants

4-7

Burda

9114

Girls Tops

2-6

 

Do this for EACH pattern manufacturer on a separate page. Then use the software’s SORT function to put each manufacturer’s pattern numbers in ascending order.  After you’ve sorted them, condense your list to one page (if possible).

Take your PATTERN WANTED list to the fabric store with you so you can take advantage of the wonderful 99 cents pattern sales. No need to look through those huge pattern books…just access the patterns in the pattern drawers using your newly created list. Be sure to check off those patterns you purchase to keep your list up-to-date for future shopping trips.

EMBROIDERYDESIGNSLABEL 

If you are like me, you have dozens…maybe hundreds of embroidery design files on your computer.  I use Husqvarna Viking’s 3D Organizer which allows me to find my designs and pictures easily. It also converts embroideries between formats or to images. You can print your designs or create a personal website gallery.  You can buy it separately or with the latest version of Husqvarna Viking Embroidery Software bundle.

hvorganizer

Husqvarna Viking Organizer

Here’s one on Ebay

You can print out indexes and individual design sheets. Organize these design sheets and even your stitched out embroidery design samples in a 3 ring binder. You can sort them by category such as fonts, holidays, girls, boys, etc.

Brother PE Design software has a Design Database included with its software:

pe-design_7.0_main

Brother PE Design 7.0

Embird has an add-on called Iconizer.  It shows a small icon of the embroidery design instead of just the file name and type. This allows you to browse and sort your designs easily, because you can see the contents of embroidery files within Windows Explorer and other Windows programs.

embirdiconizer

Embird Iconizer Free 30 Day Trial

Ann the Gran offers Catalog Xpress which works with the Ultimate Box™ and the Amazing Box™.  Use Catalog Xpress categories, or create your own, then drag-and-drop embroidery designs into them as you download, including to and from your Ultimate Box™ or Amazing Box™.

CatXPress

Catalog XPress at Ann the Gran

Download a free 30 Day Trial at Ann the Gran

BuzzXplore provides you with all the essential tools for organizing and finding your design files. You can locate, print, sort, drag-n-drop, cut, copy, paste, rename, convert, even zip and unzip files.

buzzxplore

Purchase BuzzXplore at SMR Software

Pfaff Creative Organizer

pfafforganizer

Pfaff Creative Organizer quickly converts your embroidery designs to and from most embroidery formats, either individually or by the hundreds. Create a personalized catalog for all of your designs, save your own notes for each design, and add designs to categories using a simple drag-and-drop method.

babylock

Babylock Studio Plus available at the Sewing Outlet

Babylock Studio Plus FREE TRIAL

Embroidery Magic software has a built in embroidery design database that comes stocked with 325 stock designs by Pantograms.  The Database allows the user to save and retrieve embroidery designs from specific categories.

embroiderymagic

Embroidery Magic available at Thread Artist

Embroidery Office Book Author is an embroidery design catalog and web page creator that allows you to create design catalogs.

Sierra

Free Office Book Author Demo Version

OESD Explorations software has a design library built into their software program:

oesd

Buy OESD Explorations at All Brands

Here’s some tutorials on organizing your embroidery designs without specialized software:

Secrets of Embroidery Design Organizing Tutorial

Designs by JuJu

George the Digitizer’s Helpful Hints on Organizing Designs

Artistic Threadworks Article on Organizing by Digitizer  

embroiderydesigncomputer  

Check out the Embroidery Dedupler software.  It actual cleans up all duplicate embroidery designs on your computer according to your preferred file embroidery file types.  I DEFINITELY am going to purchase this!  Available only online! 

Embroidery Dedupler at Gran’s Workroom

If you want to put your embroidery designs on CD or disk format to use in your embroidery machine or to back-up your embroidery files you have stored on your computer, you’ll need somewhere to store your CDs and/or disks:

Embroidery CD Holder

embroiderycdholder

Embroidery CD Holder at Nancy’s Notions

Embroideryorganziers

Embroidery Design Organizers at Nancy’s Notions

Here’s an adjustable CD holder that attaches to your slatwall or pegboard:

cdrack1

CD holder on Ebay

CD and Floppy Disk holders can easily be found at any office supply store. 

STITCHREFLABEL

These references are a wonderful addition to your Sewing Library. Consider starting a machine specific stitch reference for each sewing machine or serger you own to make your stitch selection a breeze. Create STITCH SHEETS which include information about your sewing machine’s special stitches, sample stitches on fabric, and other pertinent information such as tension settings, stitch length, and stitch width.

My Serger Stitch Workbook has to be one of the most useful tools in my Sewing Library. It includes the techniques and all necessary settings. I even have lots of fabric swatches to show the correct stitch tension. In addition, it includes all proper threading information necessary to easily convert to different stitches. No longer do I have to guess at what different tension settings work with each different fabric.

Store your machine specific workbooks nearby your sewing machines and sergers for easy retrieval.

SEWINGMAGLABELS

I sort all of my various sewing magazines and other periodicals in handy magazine holders which fit neatly in my shelving unit (this bookcase is in my Garden Room so I can peruse them while enjoying a nice cup of coffee). Each different publication has its own holder.

 magazineholder

Craft Magazine Sleeves

You can store your sewing and craft magazines in these clear sleeves and keep them in binders.

craftbookholders

Craft Magazine Holders at Clotilde

Magazine Sewing Binder

ottobrebinder 

I collect several pattern magazines (Ottobre, BizzKids, Topkids, Patrones Ninos and Burda).  Instead of going through each magazine to find a specific pattern, I photocopy or print out (from the web) the index section.  I then put the index in a clear plastic sleeve protector.  I then add it to my “Magazine Patterns” binder and store it on a bookshelf with my other patterns in my sewing studio.

Free Patterns from the Internet

There are lots of great free patterns on the Internet.  Be sure to print them out as they can disappear into cyberspace and be a distant memory.

Again, I put the patterns in clear sheet protectors and then in a binder divided by categories.  Here’s some website which have free sewing patterns:

About.com’s Free Sewing Projects

Burda Style Free Patterns

FreePatterns.com

Better Homes & Gardens’ Free Sewing Projects

Free Sewing Patterns at AllCrafts.com

CraftandFabricLinks.com’s Free Patterns

Savvy Seam’s Free Patterns

Bella Online’s Free Sewing Projects

All Free Crafts’ Sewing Projects

My Craft Book’s Free Sewing Patterns

BurdaMode Free Patterns

Sewing.org’s Free Sewing Projects

Babylock’s Free Projects

Marcus Brothers Textile Free Sewing Projects

Sew More For U Free Sewing Patterns

Free Baby Patterns at Space.com

DESIGNSKETCHESLABEL 

I purchased the neatest fashion design tool from Hearth Song.  It is a cool set of design elements and textures to create design sketches. I just love it. Check out the Fashion Design Studio Kits…

designsketcher

Hearth Song’s Fashion Design Studio

I keep all my design sketches, pencils and templates in the included handy plastic file case. You can also use a 3 ring binder to organize all your sketches using tabbed file dividers to categorize them.

SEWINGBOOKSLABEL

There are so many way to sort books.  I prefer to sort mine by category:

  • Garment Sewing
  • Home Décor
  • Serger Reference
  • Heirloom Sewing
  • Magazine and other periodicals
  • Design Inspiration Book
  • Design Sketch Book

Another Idea for Organizing Books

Kathleen Fasanella of Fashion Incubator’s wrote a great informational post on How to Organize Books

http://www.fashion-incubator.com/mt/archives/how_to_organize_books.html

Various Book Organizing Software

E-Library

Libellus Book Organizer

Personal Library Manager

Library Software

Complete Home Library

Book Library

My Book Database

My Favorite Books

Entrepreneur’s Guide to Sewn Product Manufacturing by Kathleen Fasanella

Sewing for Dummies by Janice Saunders Maresh

New Complete Guide to Sewing by Reader’s Digest Editors

The Ultimate Sewing Book:  Over 200 Sewing Ideas for You and Your Home by Maggi McCormick Gordon

Fine Machine Sewing 2nd Edition:  Easy Ways to Get the Look of Hand Finishing and Embellishing by Carol Laflin Ahles

Kwik Sew’s Sewing for Baby, Sewing for Toddlers and Sewing for Children by Kerstin Martensson

Serger Secrets by by Mary Griffin, Susan Huxley, Pam Hastings, Agnes Mercik, Linda Lee Vivian and Barbara Weiland

Grandmother’s Hope Chest:  French Sewing by Machine, Smocking, Shadowwork & Embroidery by Martha Pullen 

Sew Fast, Faster, Fastest:  Timesaving Techniques and Shortcuts for Busy Sewers by Sue Hausmann

The Husqvarna Viking FOOT BOOK by Deb Lathrop VanAken

501 Sewing Hints:  From the Viewers of Sewing With Nancy by Nancy Zieman

Sewing 101:  A Beginner’s Guide to Sewing by Creative Publishing International

Secrets for Successful Sewing:  Techniques for Mastering Your Sewing Machine and Serger by Barbara Weiland

Fashion Sketchbook by Bina Abling

Bend-the-Rules Sewing: The Essential Guide to a Whole New Way to Sew by  Amy Karol

In Stitches: More Than 25 Simple and Stylish Sewing Projects by Amy Butler

Dream Sewing Spaces by Lynette Black

Shirtmaking:  Developing Skills for Fine Sewing by David Page Coffin

Sewing Secrets from the Fashion Industry:  Proven Methods to Help You Sew Like the Pros by Susan Huxley

Just Pockets:  Sewing Techniques and Design Ideas by Patricia Moyes

Designer Techniques: Couture Tips for Home Sewing by Kenneth D. King

The Complete Step-By-Step Guide to Home Sewing by Jeanne Argent

If you have any additional tips to organize your sewing library, I’d love to hear about them!  Happy Organizing!

 lisasiggie

 

SEWING ROOM ORGANIZATION CHALLENGE – PART IV LACES, TRIMS AND RIBBONS©

LACE, TRIM AND RIBBON ORGANIZATION

WARNING

IF YOUR STASH FITS IN EITHER OF THESE,
READ NO FURTHER…
We will only CORRUPT YOU!

 

For some of us, our lace, trim and ribbon collection is a jumbled pile of knots. As a collector hoarder of polka dot ribbon, vintage lace and tatting, I needed to find a system where I could easily see what I had on hand when inspiration strikes.

SORT

Let’s start by taking a little inventory of our “collections.” Make 3 boxes:

KEEP – Only keep those which you LOVE or will use within the next 2 years.

DONATE – Although you may LIKE these, you’ll never use them. Give them to a friend or charitable group who will. Let’s face it, you are never going to use that 99 cent red foil Christmas trim you purchased from the Joann’s clearance bin 7 years ago!

TRASH – Stained or damaged items which nobody wants. Throw out that water-stained satin ribbon!

Next, you may need to clean your lace and trims if you haven’t already done so. We know to preshrink our fabrics, but many of us forget to do this to our lace and trims (don’t be washing that vintage silk velvet ribbon…bad idea…LOL). This is something I find necessary to do as I am always purchasing vintage trimmings. I love OxyClean to remove stains and rejuvenate vintage items. It may not be the best or safest method, but it works for me.

HOLD

Once laces and trims are washed, give them a quick press (if necessary and/or you are a bit on the obsessive side…LOL) and put them on cards of some type. Check out some of these neat ideas for holding lace, trim and ribbon:

Ribbon Cards by Cropper Hopper come in 3 different sizes. You can put one or several different trims on each card. It has a useful saw tooth slit which holds the ribbon secure.

1 ½ x 3

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=150149509569&ssPageName=MERCOSI_VI_ROSI_PR4_PCN_BIX_Stores&refitem=150149388519&itemcount=4&refwidgetloc=closed_view_item&refwidgettype=osi_widget

3 x 3

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=150154598063&ssPageName=MERCOSI_VI_ROSI_PR4_PCN_BIX_Stores&refitem=150149510066&itemcount=4&refwidgetloc=closed_view_item&refwidgettype=osi_widget

4 x 6

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=150154324819&ssPageName=MERCOSI_VI_ROSI_PR4_PCN_BIX_Stores&refitem=150135979576&itemcount=4&refwidgetloc=closed_view_item&refwidgettype=osi_widget

Love these Ribbon Holders by Sticker Stadium. These hold both wide and narrow ribbon. Starter slit keeps ribbon in place while it’s being wrapped onto the card:


http://www.stickerstadium.com/products.php

You could also use plastic PVC cards:

http://cgi.ebay.com/50-BLANK-Ink-Jet-PVC-ID-CARDS-CHEAP-Ship-cr80-30-mil_W0QQitemZ110163064224QQihZ001QQcategoryZ46695QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

Try cutting up some white corrugated plastic board:

http://cgi.ebay.com/White-Corrugated-Plastic-Board-70-Sheets-15-75-x-14-5_W0QQitemZ300143883085QQihZ020QQcategoryZ45077QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

I also found these neat die-cut ribbon holders in various sizes:


http://savvynsassy.com/shoppe/index.php?cPath=38

Or you could do what I do…make my own. Pretty simple…I use the cardboard from my husband’s dry cleaning shirt packs. I think they are about 8” x 11”.

I fold it in half lengthwise.

Staple the long end with several staples.

Cut into smaller rectangles.

Staple or tape trim to cardboard.

Wrap trim around cardboard and secure.

Check out these adorable one’s made by Sew-Mad. She’s included instructions on her blog:

http://sew-mad.blogspot.com/2006/08/get-organized.html

I keep my ribbon on the roll it came on…too lazy to re-roll it! Many scrapbooking gals re-wrap their ribbons onto round clothespins!

SECURE

You can secure the lace, trim or ribbon to the cards like I do using staples or tape. However, if you want to get fancy, you might want some Ribbon Clips (how many would I need? 500? 1,000? LOL):


http://cgi.ebay.com/Cropper-Hopper-Ribbon-Clips-NEW-RELEASE_W0QQitemZ130087279970QQihZ003QQcategoryZ71229QQrdZ1QQssPageNameZWD1VQQcmdZViewItem

http://cgi.ebay.com/NIP-Cropper-Hopper-Ribbon-Clips-25pk-CH92356_W0QQitemZ150154326501QQihZ005QQcategoryZ71229QQrdZ1QQssPageNameZWD1VQQcmdZViewItem

Or use tiny plastic or wooden clothes pins!

http://cgi.ebay.com/Plastic-clothes-pins-72-Pcs_W0QQitemZ130135975789QQihZ003QQcategoryZ31726QQrdZ1QQssPageNameZWD1VQQcmdZViewItem

http://cgi.ebay.com/48pcs-Mini-CLOTHESPIN-Baby-Shower-FAVOR-Baby-Blue_W0QQitemZ200146371029QQihZ010QQcategoryZ3208QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

http://cgi.ebay.com/25-Natural-Wood-Mini-Clothes-Pins-Scrapbooking-Stamping_W0QQitemZ8288147602QQihZ020QQcategoryZ146545QQrdZ1QQssPageNameZWD1VQQcmdZViewItem

Check these cool Roll Buddies!

http://www.nmoa.org/PRoducts/rollbuddy.htm

However, there is always the cheapskate way…straight pins!  LOL

STORE

Now it’s time to figure out what storage system will work best for you. I use three tall Rubbermaid™ rolling carts with clear drawers for my lace, trim and ribbon stash. Each drawer is labeled making retrieval simple. I even use clear drawer and/or cardboard dividers to keep the rows of laces and trims neat.

You can organize them by Type, Color, Thickness, Texture and/or Patterns (example: all polka dot ribbon in one category, stripes in another, all pink trim together, etc.). Here’s how I’ve sorted mine:

Lace Collection
Tatting
Vintage Lace
Heirloom Lace
Alencon Lace
Lace Scraps

Trim Collection
Light
Medium
Dark
Miscellaneous

Ribbon Collection
Grosgrain – thin
Grosgrain – medium
Grosgrain – wide
Satin/Organza – thin
Satin/Organza – medium
Satin/Organza – wide
Other


Every time I open my Tatting drawer, I drool!


Vintage Laces


One of my ribbon drawers

There are so many different ways to store your stash. Find one that is right for you. Here are some ideas:

JARS

If you have a small collection, you can store your stuff in clear Ball™ Jars. Target also has some cheap glass ones. Either wrap the lace, trim or ribbon around old-fashioned clothing pins or just stack rolled ribbon in the jar itself.

BOXES

Cropper Hopper has these great ribbon boxes in 3 different sizes:


http://img.inkfrog.com/pix/domesticdiva/ribboncaddy23_001.jpg” />
<a href=”http://cgi.ebay.com/NIP-Cropper-Hopper-2-25-Ribbon-Spool-Drawer-CH92411_W0QQitemZ150154327158QQihZ005QQcategoryZ71229QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

I bought these my local Discount Store. I use them to store thin satin craft ribbon. Each box fits more than a dozen of the thin ribbon rolls:

http://cgi.ebay.com/RIBBON-ORGANIZER-DURABLE-WOOD-CONSTRUCTION-HOLDS-6-ROLL_W0QQitemZ220070087135QQihZ012QQcategoryZ71224QQrdZ1QQssPageNameZWD1VQQcmdZViewItem

These are great as the lids stop the ribbon from unraveling:

http://cgi.ebay.com/STORE-IN-STYLE-SCRAPBOOK-CRAFT-RIBBON-ORGANIZER-NEW_W0QQitemZ260145835974QQihZ016QQcategoryZ71229QQrdZ1QQssPageNameZWD1VQQcmdZViewItem

Make your own Ribbon Boxes courtesy of Martha – Begin with a cardboard container (CD storage or photo box). With a utility knife, make a 1/4-inch hole in the center of both short sides. Place ribbon spools in box. Cut a 1/4-inch-thick dowel to length of box, and slide through box and spools; press wide thumbtacks into dowel ends. Cut slits for ribbon, and pull ribbon ends through. For a polished look, attach grommets using a grommet kit (available at hardware stores), and label side of box.

And if you want yours to look as good as Martha’s, just buy hers…LOL:


http://www.marthastewartcrafts.com/detail.php?p=19743&SESSID=92f417be214876bbe8fe33ff97110e24

Or you can make this one from About.com:

http://scrapbooking.about.com/od/gettingorganized/ss/ribbonbox.htm

Instead of making separate holes for each ribbon to slide through like above, consider just making one long slit in the front of the box. You can also cut holes on each short side to insert a dowel. Make sure you leave enough room for the rolls to spin.

Dollar Store Basket – Purchase a rectangle basket that has holes on all four sides. Place ribbons inside and thread ribbon through the holes. It doesn’t get much easier than this!

Here’s a portable one for those who can’t keep their ribbon displayed:

http://cgi.ebay.com/Craft-Ribbon-Organizer-Scrapbooking-Cardmaking-Crafts_W0QQitemZ104753797036QQihZ020QQcategoryZ71229QQrdZ1QQssPageNameZWD1VQQcmdZViewItem

DRAWERS

OMG!!!! How BEAUTIFUL are these Ribbon Lockers? Apparently, they are so popular that they are currently back-ordered!


http://www.craftlocker.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=1&products_id=1

Check out this gorgeous handmade ribbon drawer:

http://cgi.ebay.com/Ribbon-Storage-Drawer-Melissa-Frances-White-JA649_W0QQitemZ150153402503QQihZ005QQcategoryZ71229QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

Perhaps try some of the Sterlite™ rolling drawer units:


http://www.target.com/gp/detail.html/sr=1-4/qid=1188311173/ref=sr_1_4/601-1872350-6472920?ie=UTF8&asin=B000MPQ2S2

http://www.target.com/gp/detail.html/sr=1-8/qid=1188311299/ref=sr_1_8/601-1872350-6472920?ie=UTF8&asin=B000AVS3FS


RACKS

These professional display racks will work wonderfully if you have an unlimited budget:

http://www.floralsupply.com/cat.cgi?s=CRM-5%20Vertical%20Ribbon%20Rack&c=disp

http://www.floralsupply.com/cat.cgi?s=CRM-5%20Vertical%20Ribbon%20Rack&c=disp

However, instead of shelling out all that cash, why not use an adjustable CD rack?


http://cgi.ebay.com/Elf-Jr-Multimedia-Storage-Tower-CD-DVD-Rack-Shelf-Gift_W0QQitemZ260153504503QQihZ016QQcategoryZ22653QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

HANGING HOLDERS

Use a 5 pair metal slacks hanger. Slide the ribbon rolls onto the bar and reattach the latch.

http://cgi.ebay.com/SWING-ARM-SLACK-PANTS-HANGER-CLOSET-ORGANIZER_W0QQitemZ300145314710QQihZ020QQcategoryZ43505QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

Over the Door Rack (usually used for canned goods or video tapes) are perfect for storing ribbons on rolls:


http://www.target.com/gp/detail.html/sr=1-1/qid=1188310719/ref=sr_1_1/601-1872350-6472920?ie=UTF8&asin=B00077JFWA

This Shoe Rack might also work:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=330160148926&ssPageName=MERCOSI_VI_ROSI_PR4_PCN_BIX_Stores&refitem=330155054021&itemcount=4&refwidgetloc=closed_view_item&refwidgettype=osi_widget

MOUNTED HOLDERS

While my mind is in the Gutter, darling Martha is thinking vertical! Use Gutters to keep ribbons and trims organized. Have a lumberyard (or your local home improvement store) cut a half-round copper or plastic gutter to size and add gutter end caps.

Cropper Hopper’s Rail System Holder:

http://cgi.ebay.com/Lisa-Becky-Organizer-Ribbon-Spool-Holder-Cropper-Hopper_W0QQitemZ140146807581QQihZ004QQcategoryZ146402QQrdZ1QQssPageNameZWD1VQQcmdZViewItem

http://www.target.com/gp/detail.html/sr=1-1/qid=1188311429/ref=sr_1_1/601-1872350-6472920?ie=UTF8&asin=B000REOFUK

Regular or Magnetic Café Curtain Rods make a great ribbon holder:

What about a Bathroom Towel holder?

A paper towel holder would work, too!

The Ribbon Buddy™ is by far MY VERY FAVORITE (I have two of these)!  It can either be mounted to the wall or hung over a door. Best of all, it’s can be brought over to your work surface as it has an A-frame! I use it for all my rolls of tulle and trim (the cheap stuff). During the holidays, I add rolls of wrapping paper, too. I’ve looked everywhere to find these online to no avail…sorry!

Love this one from Organize More as it has no dowels:

http://www.organizemore.com/product.sc?productId=11

Check out this terrific Ribbon Wheel:


http://cgi.ebay.com/New-Ribbon-Rack-Organizer-Crafts-Scrapbooking-Sewing_W0QQitemZ160124243748QQihZ006QQcategoryZ71229QQrdZ1QQssPageNameZWD1VQQcmdZViewItem

You can also purchase a Quick Release Mounting Bar for the above Ribbon Wheel:

http://cgi.ebay.com/New-Quick-Release-Mounting-Kit-to-Ribbon-Rack-Organizer_W0QQitemZ160063376829QQihZ006QQcategoryZ71229QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

The ribbon wheel can also be clamped to a table with these:


http://cgi.ebay.com/New-Table-Clamp-Kit-for-Ribbon-Rack-Organizer_W0QQitemZ160063369113QQihZ006QQcategoryZ71229QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

Darla Jones’ husband, Ralph, created this awesome Ribbon Wheel which holds 170 – 200 rolls!!! It can be mounted to the wall or a table. WOW! Ummm…Darla, can I borrow your husband? I promise to return him when I’m done…LOL

I adore this Ribbon/Trim Holder Carrin of Rain’s End made for her stash. She even painted it, too! Detailed instructions can be found on her blog:

http://rainsend.blogspot.com/2007/08/ribbon-drawer-organizer-project.html

RINGS

A Ring and Header system works great for scrapbooking:

ribbonring

Ribbon Rings and Ribbon Tags 

And when you’re ready to use your newly organized stash, perhaps you might want one of these nifty gadgets:


Pebbles™ Ribbon Iron

http://cgi.ebay.com/RIBBON-IRON-scrapbooking-PEBBLES-INC-mini-iron-CRAFTS_W0QQitemZ110162558827QQihZ001QQcategoryZ134628QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

http://cgi.ebay.com/Pebbles-Inc-Ribbon-Iron-NIP_W0QQitemZ330115485832QQihZ014QQcategoryZ11791QQrdZ1QQssPageNameZWD1VQQcmdZViewItem

You could also use a hair straightening iron set on LOW and better yet, a regular iron! The Ribbon Iron would come in handy if you needed portability.

If you have any clever ideas for organizing your lace, trims and ribbons, I’d love to hear about them!

Happy Organizing!

SEWING ROOM ORGANIZATION CHALLENGE – PART III NEEDLES, PINS AND STABILIZERS©

SEWING ROOM ORGANIZATION CHALLENGE
PART 3 – NEEDLES, PINS AND STABILIZERS

OK girls…time to move onto Part 3…
NEEDLES, PINS and STABILIZERS!

NEEDLES
Divide and store your machine sewing needles by size and/or type. In the past, I have used clear divided Tupperware™ storage wedges for my needle storage and labeled the different plastic wedged-shaped containers as follows:

needles.jpg

  • 70/10
  • 80/12
  • 90/14
  • 100/16
  • Specialty – metallic, topstitching, twin needles, etc.

However, since I now buy my needles wholesale by the dozens, I had to get something larger for my needles. I found this larger storage carousel at Staples:

needlestorage1.jpg

Here’s a great article from HGTV on the different types of sewing machine needles.

There are many different clear divided storage containers available to store your new needles:

12 compartment Carousel Storage Wheel

Tupperware 6 wedge Carousel

17 Compartment Storage Box

Plastic Storage Bin Container Tray

Clear Plastic Storage Boxes

Plastic Storage Case

6 Slot Locking Storage Box

Craft Mates Locking Storage Box

Another great idea for new needle storage is to use a small photo album with clear divided pages. You could also use clear trading card dividers and put them in a binder. You could easily find a photo brag book in the Dollar Store!

Check out this Diva one!

Princess Brag Book

Here’s a cute Leather brag book:

Leather Photo Album

Trading card sleeves:

Trading Card Sleeves

More Trading Card Sleeves

USED NEEDLES / NEEDLES IN USE

Use an old-fashioned tomato pin cushion to temporary distinguish the current needle in your machine and your slightly used needles. Using a black marker to divide and mark your tomato into sections:

tomatopincushion.jpg

  • E for Embroidery Needles
  • F for Fine Machine Needles
  • S70, S80, S90 according to the standard sizes you used most often
  • T for Topstitching Needles
  • M for Metallic Needles

Put a bright colored pin in the appropriate space on your tomato pin cushion to hold the place of the current needle in your machine.

Pick up one of these pin cushions at your local craft store or on eBay:

Simplicity Tomato Pin Cushion

Even better yet, Dritz now has a Dresden pincushion!

fonsporterpincushion.gif

Here’s a similar one available online:

Dritz Tomato Pin Cushion

Also check out this GRABBIT Needle Organizer. Just slide a needle into the loop strip next to the appropriate spaces and it stays put. You can also label the blank spaces. It also has an “IN USE” pin marker to easily identify the needle which is currently in your machine:

needlegrabbitmainphoto.jpg

Grabbit Machine Needle Organizer

You might even like this nifty NEEDLETRAK™ by the Quilted Ribbon. You can easily keep track of your needle in your machine by moving the arrow indicators to appropriate needle style and size. It also attaches to your machine:

needletrak.jpg

And if you don’t want to spend the $6 – $10 on the above Needletrak, you can make your own. I found this neat idea from the Moonlight Quilters Organization:

needlecasemoonlight.jpg

To make a needle case similar to the one pictured above:

  • Cut 8” squares of Muslin, Batting AND printed cotton fabric. You should have 3 squares.
  • Use a permanent pen to write the types and sizes of needles you use on the Muslim. (You could also draw your lines on a piece of tear away stabilizer and then just tear it away when you’re finished.)
  • Use black thread to stitch the continuous grid you see in the picture. (Note: I’d cheat by making up a simple embroidery design file in my embroidery customizing program so I can stitch these out for my friends).
  • Stitch a small piece of Velcro to the right side of the printed fabric. (Moonlight Quilter’s directions state to add a small piece of ribbon to sides, but I think the Velcro is a better idea as you don’t have to fuss with the ribbon ties…you just stick it to your machine with the coordinating Velcro piece.)
  • Place the printed fabric and batting right sides together on top of the muslin.
  • Stitch around all sides leaving a 2” space for turning.
  • Clip your corners to reduce bulk prior to turning.
  • Topstitch around all sides.

Presto…you have a neat handmade needle case! However, if you are really lazy, you could always use Velcro dots. Just stick a Velcro dot to the needle case of the needle you have in your sewing machine. It doesn’t get simpler than that!

Here’s something for your HAND NEEDLES…The Colonial NEEDLEPACK:

needlepack.jpg

This compact hand needle organizer with pocket guide for selecting the right needle and thread for your project comes with Colonial English-made hand needles. It has 5 pockets for storing new needles and clear-view slots for separating used needles or for setting up multiple needles for projects. Also includes a set of printed labels included.

Lastly, Fons & Porter now have these needle disposal cases for sale:

fonsneedledisposal.jpg

Is it me or are those totally useless? Why would you spend money of those when you could easily use an empty needle case or a film container? JMHO…

PINS

There are lots of ways to hold your sewing pins.  Try one of these:

grabbit 

Grabbit Magnetic Pincushion

magneticpaperclip

A Magnetic Paper Clip Holder is perfect for holding your regular pins.

wristgrabbit

Wrist Grabbit Wearable Magnetic Pincushion

collinswristpincushion

Collins Wrist Pin Cushion

bowl

Magnetic Bowl

sew_WANderful-lg

Sew Wanderful Magnetic Pin Holder

divapincushion

You can make your own pincushion to match your sewing room.  Here’s a list of tons of pincushion tutorials:

Diva’s List of Pincushion Tutorials

However, if you don’t feel like making own yourself, check out all the handmade pincushions on Etsy.com.

STABILIZERS AND INTERFACINGS

It is very easy to become confused with all the different stabilizers and interfacings available to the home sewer. When I purchase them on small rolls, I mark the cardboard roll and stick the original plastic packaging inside the roll (the instructions are then easy to find). If I purchase stabilizers or interfacings from a bolt, I wrap it with its original instructions.

All stabilizers and interfacings can be stored in a large clear rolling bin (clearly labeled, of course). However, I recently came up with a much better solution….why not use a soda bottle holder or wine rack? Since I gave up soda a few months ago, I was about to throw out my 2 liter soda bottle holder…yet now it holds my stabilizers on a shelf! I wish I had thought of that sooner! No more digging in the big stabilizer box. I still will use the box for large "yardage" of interfacings on bolts. Here’s a photo of my soda/stabilizer holder…

stabilizerholder.jpg

There are many useful ones available on eBay:

Wooden Wine Rack

Metal Wine Rack

Another Wine Rack

and yet another Wine Rack…LOL

and another

last one

You could even use a Plastic Wrap Organizer and mount it to the wall:

Rubbermaid Kitchen Wrap Organizer

Wire Kitchen Wrap Organizer

Think you can handle this challenge? You have 72 hours! Please post your BEFORE and AFTER pictures as soon as you’re finished!

Good luck!

lisasiggie.jpg

SEWING ROOM ORGANIZATION CHALLENGE – PART II THREAD©

 

PART II – THREAD ORGANIZATION

Okay girls! Time to move on to NOTION COMMOTION!!! We will start by organizing your mess of threads and bobbins!  Here goes…

THREAD
The most basic “notion” would have to be thread. I divide my thread “collections” by type. Consider wooden thread racks which can be wall mounted or placed in a top drawer, clear thread and cone cases, or even Matchbox™ Car plastic storage containers which perfectly fit most embroidery threads. Here’s how I contain my ever-expanding thread collection:

Regular Sewing Thread: clear thread cases on rolling cart

Embroidery Thread: clear thread cases on rolling cart
Serger Thread: clear cone thread cases on rolling cart

Here’s my two rolling carts of clear thread storage…All threads are arranged within their type in color order. It makes finding the right thread for your project a breeze! Be sure to put your thread away in its proper container when you take it out of your machine.

Here’s my friend’s Thread Wall 

 

The June Tailor Thread Racks come in several different sizes (33, 66 and 120).  You can get them with (for placing on a table) or without legs (for wall mounting):

 junetailor.jpg

woodenthreadrack.jpg 

Here’s a neat Matchbox type case:

threadmatchbox.gif  

BOBBINS
I keep my different types of bobbins in separate clear bobbin holders (cases). There are also great bobbin wheels available at your local sewing store.

CLEAR BOBBIN HOLDERS

clearbobbinbox.jpg bobbinbox33.jpg

BOBBIN WHEEL
bobbinholder22.jpg
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=280132213617&ssPageName=MERCOSI_VI_ROSI_PR4_PCN_BIX_Stores&refitem=8273750465&itemcount=4&refwidgetloc=closed_view_item&refwidgettype=osi_widget
 

FOAM BOBBIN HOLDER

 foambobbinholder.jpg

MAGNETIC BOBBIN HOLDER

 magneticbobbinholder1.jpg

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=230134975584&ssPageName=MERCOSI_VI_ROSI_PR4_PCN_BIX&refitem=8266555246&itemcount=4&refwidgetloc=closed_view_item&refwidgettype=osi_widget

Check out these cool bobbin holders that attach to the top of your thread spool:handibobs.jpg


http://cgi.ebay.com/Singer-Featherweight-Bobbin-Holder-Handi-Bobs-25_W0QQitemZ130132318938QQihZ003QQcategoryZ41243QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem
 

Here’s the answer to unraveling bobbins:

 bobbinunravel.jpg

http://cgi.ebay.com/Bobbin-Protection-and-Thread-Holders_W0QQitemZ280130580250QQihZ018QQcategoryZ4836QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem  

Check out Hugo’s Amazing Tape

 hugo140001332.jpghugobobbin.jpghugothread.jpg

The best Thread Saver! Keeps embroidery thread and sewing threads from tangling.   Also great for bobbins!

Another TIP:  I use a waterproof black marker to differentiate the types of bobbin thread. All regular bobbins are not marked, however, I put an “F” on the bobbins used for fine (thin) thread, an “E” for embroidery bobbin thread and an “S” for silk thread.

So girls…you have 72 hours (3 days) to complete this challenge! Please post your BEFORE pictures now and then your AFTER pictures of your newly organized thread storage as soon as you’re done!

Good Luck!

lisasiggie.jpg

SEWING ROOM ORGANIZATION CHALLENGE – PART I FABRIC©

Let’s get started!

FABRIC ORGANIZATION

DAY 1 – 2
You will need to set aside 4 to 5 days depending on the amount of fabric you own. If it takes longer, you certainly know you have more fabric than you can use in two lifetimes! Let’s start going through the tons of fabric we’ve “collected” to make those “special” projects (which we never completed).

Here’s a glimpse at my fabric cabinet prior to organizing (note: fabrics overflowing…that’s why were organizing):

Make some little cardboard signs as follows (choose the option which will work best for you):

OPTION “A” FOR THOSE WHO USE ALL TYPES OF FABRIC REGULARLY

  • Cotton SOLIDS
  • Cottons PRINTS (all your Michael Millers, Amy Butlers, etc. and those that would be used for quilting)
  • Knits (the stretchy stuff and other “blends”)
  • Flannels/fleece (cottons used to loungewear, and other kid things)
  • Specialty (sequins, lames, lycras, anything embellished, etc.)
  • Sheers (chiffons, organza, etc.)
  • Satins/silks
  • Chenille (including bedspreads)
  • Home decor (upholstery weight)

OPTION “B” FOR QUILTERS WHO MAINLY USE COTTONS
Separate into colors

  • Black & Gray
  • White
  • Off-White, Beige, Ivory
  • Brown
  • Purple
  • Blue
  • Green
  • Red
  • Pink
  • Orange, Rust
  • Yellow, Gold
  • Any other colors I’ve missed
  • Other fabrics not used for quilting can be grouped using OPTION “A”

Start SORTING your fabric into the above categories. Depending on the amount of fabric you own, this step can take 1 to 2 days.

If you come across fabric you haven’t used in two years, get rid of it! If you haven’t used it by now, you probably won’t! Sell it on E-Bay, donate it to your local senior citizen friendship club or simply THROW IT OUT!

DAY 3

Use your sewing table or other large CLEANED surface (which should be done by now) to refold everything into thirds.

I learned a new TRICK from the shop owners in the NYC fabric district for folding large yardage of fabric. Take a YARD STICK or a BROOM HANDLE and wrap the yardage AROUND IT. Then lay the fabric down, pull out the yard stick and fold in thirds.

When you’ve finished sorting, you will need to acquire baskets or containers (plastic, wicker or cardboard).
Here’s a photo of the baskets I’ve purchased in the past. They measure 12 inches by 16 inches and 5 inches high. Anything close is good. I purchased these for $1 each at a discount odd lot store. I’ve also found awesome fabric covered baskets at both Home Goods and Linens n Things for $3 to $5 each. Look how easy it is to see the fabric?

Now when you take one basket out of your fabric cabinet or shelf, it all stays neat. I also purchased some that were 8 inches high for my bulkier fabric such as chenille and fleece.

Now would be a good time to measure the depth of your shelving as you should not purchase baskets longer than that measurement. Most shelving measures between 16” and 24” deep. Purchase as many as you need to hold all your fabric. Shoe boxes are too small for this purpose. Putting the fabric in baskets enables you to pull out the baskets and remove only the fabric you need (no more digging for a particular fabric). If you’ve had your fabric stacked one on top of another, you know how frustrating it is to pull out one piece of fabric and have the entire stack fall. Also, stacking fabric does not give you a clear view of what you have.

Fabric Organizer Boards

BBSIL

Another method is to use Comic Book Boards to organize your fabric.Caro of Split Yarn came up with this brilliant idea and Carla has a simple fabric folding tutorial here.

Happy Zombie’s Fabric Folding Tutorial

FAT QUARTERS AND FABRIC SCRAPS

The basket system works great for fat quarters.  However, you might also want to consider:

clipitup

Clip It Up Organizers

fatquarterorganizer

DeNieces Designs’ Fabric Organizer for Fat Quarters

storagesheets

Polar Notion’s Fabric Storage Sheets

fatquartertote

Fat Quarter Tote from Joann’s Fabrics

artbinsuperslim

Art Bin Super Slim Satchel

artbindivided

Art Bin 4 Tab Divided Satchel

Then use these to store your Art Bin Satchels:

artbincaddy

Super Satchel Cube

fatquarterbox

Fat Quarter Cardboard Organizers

fonsporter

Fons & Porter Quilter’s Fat Quarter Box

bongobag

Bongo Bag

FABRIC BOLTS

For those of you who purchase bolts of fabric, you will need to acquire large plastic or aluminum garbage cans if you want to store them standing up. You can also stack them on the shelves.

Also consider:

fabricboltdisplay

Fabric Bolt Displays

fabricsupports

Fabric Supports

09fabricboltdisp

Modern Fixtures’ Fabric Bolt Displayer

FABRIC ROLL STORAGE

rollstorage

Corrugated Roll File

DAY 4
Put your sorted fabric (which is now folded neatly) in the baskets one behind the other (so you can easily see what is in each basket).

LABEL each basket and put them on your shelves or whatever other storage system you have. A label maker is a great tool to have. You can buy one for under $30 at your local office supply store. Otherwise, type and print up some labels on your computer.

It may be impossible for some of you to do this in consecutive days…however, there is no reason you cannot finish this within a week.

For those of you (like myself) who like to serge and wash all fabric when purchased, add TWO DAYS to your organization project. NOTE: it is best to serge raw ends of all your fabric as you bring into the house and then wash it, so you’re ready to sew when inspiration strikes.

Here’s the AFTER photo!!!

YOU CAN DO IT!!!

lisasiggie

Updated 1/12/08

 

 

THE SEWING ROOM ORGANIZATION CHALLENGE BEGINS NOW!

Ok Ladies…

It’s that time again…time to clean out the clutter in our sewing rooms and get them ORGANIZED!

Over the last few months, many of us have been trying to get our sewing spaces in order. For many of us, this is our biggest challenge. We are breaking it up into manageable tasks, so we can finally find lost fabric and have room to create.

Let’s start by sharing our BEFORE photos. 5 yards of fabric for the messiest one posted…LOL

Many of us are simply embarrassed by the mess in our sewing spaces….so find a “sewing buddy” to privately share your shame if you are not brave enough to post here…but then you don’t get a prize.

First up:

THE CUTTING TABLE

Our first task will be to clear off our cutting table or main work area. By doing this, you will have a large surface to sort your fabrics and various sewing notions.

My current cutting table is a medium-sized conference table (measures 36” by 72”) which holds 3 large cutting mats. Ideally, your cutting table should be placed in the center of the room where you can walk around it and cut from any angle. I also have my cutting table on adjustable bed risers so it helps my back.

Recently I purchased several industrial cutting tables, but won’t be setting them up until after the home renovation. So for the time being, my good old conference table will have to do.

Next up will be the 1st Challenge (Fabric Organization)…so be sure to check back!

Now let’s see those pics!

lisasiggie

Sewing Pattern Reorganization

pattern4

Why is it that I can’t seem to ever put away my sewing patterns?  I mean, I even wrote a huge blog post about organizing your sewing patterns.  You’d think I’d have this Sewing Room Organization thing under control.  No such luck.

pattern1

I have turquoise binders,

pattern2

pink binders,

pattern3

and some more pink binders.

Did you count all the pattern binders?  Yep…there’s 18 of them! 5 Turquoise binders and 13 Hot Pink binders.

And that’s it.  I’m not buying anymore binders.  The bookcase where I keep my sewing pattern binders has 3 shelves which neatly fit 6 binders each…I’m maxed out at 18 binders.  There simple isn’t anymore room for patterns.

And I’m not buying anymore sewing patterns either.  Seriously…I rarely use any of them.  I buy them to read the construction details.  I’m always looking for a quicker way to do a sewing technique, etc.  Tell the truth—you do it, too, right?

pattern5

I had dozens and dozens of patterns, some old, some new, laying around all over my sewing room.  It was time to finally reorganize and try to consolidate my pattern collection.  I was able to part with a whole box of patterns and will give them away on my local Freecycle website.

pattern6

I used my Silhouette SD Electronic Cutter to make some vinyl labels for the pattern binders.  How cute!

 pattern7

I was tempted to paint my ugly old faux wood bookcase, but I’ll have to save that for another day (or year).

pattern8

I keep the patterns I use most often on professional pattern hooks for easy access.  They hang from the basement rafters next to the sewing pattern bookcase.

I feel so much better now that I’ve reorganized my sewing patterns.  Only problem now is my fabric pile of shame.  Don’t laugh…you have one of those, too!

Happy Sewing!

lisasiggie2

Organizing Your Sewing Room: Fabric Stash – Fat Quarters, Fabric Scraps and Even Fabric Bolt

clipitup

Irene of Mushroom Villagers asked what to do with all her fabric scraps, so I added some ideas on organizing fat quarters, fabric scraps and even fabric bolts to The Sewing Room Organization Challenge – Part I – Fabric Organization.  Check it out!

Wishing you a fabulous weekend!

lisa

 

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